arabesco coffee table

arabesco coffee table

Design Carlo Mollino, 1949
Bent plywood, tempered plate glass, stainless steel
Made in Italy by Zanotta

Arabesco table was originally designed by Mollino in 1949 for the living room of Casa Orenga in Turin. In designing this piece, Mollino started to see pieces of furniture as autonomous objects, incorporating erotic associations into his furniture desings, rather than architectural elements. It is said that the unique look of the tabletop takes its form from the rear-view perspective in Reclining Nude, a drawing by Léonor Fini. Also, the table frame is said to reference Surrealist motifs by Salvador Dali and Jean Arp.

His friends called him "Carlo il Bizarro." Architect Carlo Mollino was always attempting to escape the monotony of the everyday working world. He occupied himself in numerous activities outside his profession like photography, race cars, fashion design, composed essays and also did architecture. Throughout his career, Mollino acquired numerous patents for concrete honeycomb constructions, tubular steel joints, and molded plywood elements, inventing devices for creating perspective drawings, streamlined race car bodies, automatic drift correction instruments for airplanes, and improved chain and sprocket drives for bicycles. His works have won numerous awards as well as being showcased in museums around the globe.

The Arabesco Table features a bent plywood frame veneered with natural oak. The frame is fastened to the top by means of stainless steel discs fixed to the glass. The glass top is .4" thick tempered plate glass and the bottom shelf is .3" thick tempered plate glass.

50.8" w | 20.9" d | 17.7" h | glass top: .4" thick | lower glass shelf: .3" thick

$4,990.00 + free shipping in the continental U.S.
(please allow 12-16 weeks for delivery)

Carlo Mollino

Carlo Mollino of Turin, Italy was more inspired by his eccentric interests than he ever was by convention. Though beginning his career as an architect, Mollino moved into other disciplines, where he infused his loves of skiing, race car driving, the female form, and the occult. Of his many works, the highest demand is made for his furniture, due to its rarity. His pieces were mostly all commissioned, and are scarce. Mollino’s interests culminate in his furniture design, which display mechanical function, the wooden angles of Alpine homes, and womanly curves. As a ski-enthusiast, he wrote a book sharing his personal skiing methods. As a photographer, he worked largely with Polaroids and used his apartment as the stylized set for his nude female subjects. One room in his apartment had an even more specific purpose, designed to be Mollino’s own tomb in which he hoped to die and remain. However; this idea, directly inspired by the Egyptian pharaohs, was unrealized. He died of an unexpected heart-attack in 1973.
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