stewie floor lamp

stewie floor lamp

Design Luca Nichetto, 2012
Fabric coated polyethylene foam, lacquered metal
Made in Italy by Foscarini

Stewie introduces a new kind of light. The concept behind the project, whose name is derived from a famous cartoon, is the result of the careful observation of an object that has nothing to do with lighting design: a washbasin placed in an unusual location in their studio that has the air of a work by Duchamp. Its form is what inspired the idea to design a lamp that is innovative in terms of its form, its dimensions, and its positioning. By melding the study of the washbasin with an analysis of Japanese paper lamps, Nichetto came up with Stewie: a floor lamp whose illumination, which emanates from below but also radiates upward, puts the objects it illuminates "in a new light". Stewie can also be faced toward the wall in order to create a softer, more diffused light.

The polymeric foam employed to make the lamp was carefully selected for specific characteristics, namely its lightness, its permeability to light, and its ability to be paired with fabric. Stewie is thus a shell whose light source is housed within a textile filling that filters the illumination. Stewie is offered in two color choices.

30.25" w | 10.25" d | 27" h | cord: 102" L | on/off switch: 43" from lamp
requires 1x40W 2GX13 fluorescent bulb

$1,489.00 + free shipping in the continental U.S.
(usually ships in 5-7 days)
Riccardo Olivieri set up Foscarini Spa in Murano in 1981. Two years later, they debuted their catalog, with lamps from Carlo Urbinati and Allesandro Vecchiato, who would become the company’s managers by 1988. Eventually these new owners would move the company off the island and into Venice, as well as transition Foscarini from a glassworks shop to a major design competitor. They had already begun working with external designers in 1985, but their first success came in 1990 with Rodolfo Dordoni’s “Lumiere.” Most all lighting projects were made of glass until 1993, at which point the Havana lamp primarily used polyethylene, making it lighter, more cost-effective, and able to be used indoors and outdoors. It now resides in the MoMA in New York. Other successful lamps would come to define the company, such as the “Mite & Tite” series by Marc Sadler in 2000 (which earned a Compasso d’oro), Patricia Urquiola’s 2005 “Caboche,” and Marc Sadler’s signature lamp "Twiggy."
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