solar - outdoor

solar - outdoor

solar - outdoor

Design Luca Nicheto, 2011
Polyethylene, textured material
Made in Italy by Foscarini

A poetic and relaxing glow, delimited by the terrestrial curve and framed by nature: this is what inspired solar. Its soft luminosity recalls that of the sun at dawn or at dusk, its hemispherical shape recalls the celestial vault, whereas the round resting surface recalls an eclipse. Not just a new lamp, but a new type of object, a contemporary hearth around which to gather and chat, at home or outside.

The two versions of solar differ in certain significant details, depending on the setting they are intended for. In the indoor model, the resting surface is slightly concave, with its edges just slightly raised. The outdoor version instead has a straight resting surface that is flush with the outer edge, to allow the rain to just slip away. The surface finishes are also different: glossy white or dark wood for the indoor version, steel with a characteristic textured effect for the outdoor version.

Solar is not only versatile in the settings it blends in with, but also in the fact it can be given different positions and provide different types of lighting. The hemispherical body, made of waterproof and unbreakable polyethylene, is perfectly stable, even when it is tilted by 15°. The angling determines the quantity of light diffused, allowing multiple effects and atmospheres to be created. A bright, warm and intimate center of attraction, Solar is ideal for scenic compositions, such as a large hall or in the garden, to create suggestive light paths.

31.25" dia. | 10.25" h | 15º tilt | requires 1x25W E26 compact fluorescent

$1,575.00 + free shipping in the continental U.S.
(usually ships in 7-10 days)
Riccardo Olivieri set up Foscarini Spa in Murano in 1981. Two years later, they debuted their catalog, with lamps from Carlo Urbinati and Allesandro Vecchiato, who would become the company’s managers by 1988. Eventually these new owners would move the company off the island and into Venice, as well as transition Foscarini from a glassworks shop to a major design competitor. They had already begun working with external designers in 1985, but their first success came in 1990 with Rodolfo Dordoni’s “Lumiere.” Most all lighting projects were made of glass until 1993, at which point the Havana lamp primarily used polyethylene, making it lighter, more cost-effective, and able to be used indoors and outdoors. It now resides in the MoMA in New York. Other successful lamps would come to define the company, such as the “Mite & Tite” series by Marc Sadler in 2000 (which earned a Compasso d’oro), Patricia Urquiola’s 2005 “Caboche,” and Marc Sadler’s signature lamp "Twiggy."
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