falena wall/ceiling lampolio ceiling lamp

falena wall/ceiling lampolio ceiling lamp

falena wall/ceiling lampolio ceiling lamp

Design Marc Sadler, 2011
Lacquered aluminum
Made in Italy by Foscarini

Its name, in Italian, comes from the shape of the front diffuser which recalls the wings of a moth, irresistibly drawn to the light cast onto the wall. It is a simple and everyday image for a discreet, essential and highly functional lamp, designed to team technical and decorative features.

The diffuser is a simple metallic element folded towards the observer, embellished by cut and rounded profiles. The light source is completely screened yet diffused through an opening that directs it up and down. this makes for intense, non glaring illumination. Even when turned off, Falena generates a discreet play of light and shadow, owing to the particular shape of the metallic diffuser.

Available in two different sizes and two neutral colors - white and anthracite grey - Falena accommodates the most diverse lighting requirements: from a small service lamp to large multiple compositions. Can also be ceiling mounted. The simple design, its functionality, sturdiness and dust protection, make it perfect of any setting: from contract to domestic, from bathrooms to bedrooms.

falena 2: 30.1" L | 2.9" w | 3.5" d | requires 1x24W G5 type T5 fluorescent
falena 3: 53.75" L | 2.9" w | 3.5" d | requires 1x54W G5 type T5 fluorescent

falena 2: $1,023.00 + free shipping in the continental U.S.
(usually ships in 5-7 business days)
Riccardo Olivieri set up Foscarini Spa in Murano in 1981. Two years later, they debuted their catalog, with lamps from Carlo Urbinati and Allesandro Vecchiato, who would become the company’s managers by 1988. Eventually these new owners would move the company off the island and into Venice, as well as transition Foscarini from a glassworks shop to a major design competitor. They had already begun working with external designers in 1985, but their first success came in 1990 with Rodolfo Dordoni’s “Lumiere.” Most all lighting projects were made of glass until 1993, at which point the Havana lamp primarily used polyethylene, making it lighter, more cost-effective, and able to be used indoors and outdoors. It now resides in the MoMA in New York. Other successful lamps would come to define the company, such as the “Mite & Tite” series by Marc Sadler in 2000 (which earned a Compasso d’oro), Patricia Urquiola’s 2005 “Caboche,” and Marc Sadler’s signature lamp "Twiggy."
please configure
your selection below
quantity

$1,023.00

free shipping!