planet suspension lamp

planet suspension lamp

planet suspension lamp

Design Changedesign, 2011
Embroidered fabric
Made in Italy by Foscarini

The initial challenge was to create a fabric lamp that was completely empty and without an inner frame. The idea was to create a load-bearing seam, which would be simultaneously structural and decorative. Inspiration came from a system devised for the "smart clothing" used by astronauts, where external embroidery stitched with a special yarn allows the suit to adhere to the body, retaining total flexibility and freedom of movement, even in zero gravity.

By reinterpreting this technology Foscarini reinvented a familiar spherical object called Planet. A special yarn has been sewn onto the fabric surface which, when exposed to high temperatures, changes its molecular structure, stiffening it into a support. This material, depending on the color, also marks the personality of the lamp. Like the surface of the moon, the embroidered lines resemble the rifts and mountains of this luminous body. The two sizes blend seamlessly with any setting - from contract to domestic environments. With Planet, Foscarini continues to explore the universe of lighting with thrilling and all-new results, every time.

small: 21.6" dia. | max drop: 214" | cord length: 193" | ceiling plate: 6.25" dia.
requires 1x100W E26 type T10 halogen or 1x32W GX24q-3 type T4 fluorescent

large: 31.5" dia. | max drop: 224" | cord length: 193" | ceiling plate: 6.25" dia.
requires 1x150W E26 halogen or 1x42W GX24q-4 type T4 fluorescent

small: $1,323.00 + free shipping in the continental U.S.
(usually ships in 7-10 days)
Riccardo Olivieri set up Foscarini Spa in Murano in 1981. Two years later, they debuted their catalog, with lamps from Carlo Urbinati and Allesandro Vecchiato, who would become the company’s managers by 1988. Eventually these new owners would move the company off the island and into Venice, as well as transition Foscarini from a glassworks shop to a major design competitor. They had already begun working with external designers in 1985, but their first success came in 1990 with Rodolfo Dordoni’s “Lumiere.” Most all lighting projects were made of glass until 1993, at which point the Havana lamp primarily used polyethylene, making it lighter, more cost-effective, and able to be used indoors and outdoors. It now resides in the MoMA in New York. Other successful lamps would come to define the company, such as the “Mite & Tite” series by Marc Sadler in 2000 (which earned a Compasso d’oro), Patricia Urquiola’s 2005 “Caboche,” and Marc Sadler’s signature lamp "Twiggy."
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