tropico - bell

tropico - bell

tropico - bell

Design Giulio Iacchetti, 2008
Thermoplastic resin, chromed metal
Made in Italy by Foscarini

The Tropico suspension module is the result of long research. Its lozenge-shaped, sculptural presence, with no visual hooks, was honed mold after mold. Its material, ABS, was chosen because it is light and hard-wearing, but also for the material sensation it transmits when it is penetrated by light. The rings to which the lozenge elements are attached recall the earth's parallels and hence the name, Tropico.

The lamp can be customized by simply inserting a colored thread with a magnet. the ring structure creates a second skin around the inner cylinder - an interplay of full and empty spaces, suitable for a public or private setting. Sculptural, elegant, yet easy to understand, to customize and to place: this is Tropico.

An industrial designer since 1992, Giulio Iacchetti carries out an intense educational work for several universities and design schools, in Italy and abroad. He was awarded a number of international prizes. In 2001 his project for a disposable fork "Moscardino" (designed with Matteo Ragni) won the Compasso d'Oro ADI and is now part of the permanent design exhibition at MOMA, New York.

Composed by elements in thermoplastic resin connected onto metal rings, Tropico suspension lamp is available in four versions and two finish options (ice & ivory). Optional colored filters (violet or orange) also available for further customization.

25.6" h | 29.5" dia. | ceiling rose: 6.25" dia.
requires 1x42W GX24q-4 type T4 fluorescent bulb

$2,219.00 + free shipping in the continental U.S.
(usually ships in 7-10 days)
Riccardo Olivieri set up Foscarini Spa in Murano in 1981. Two years later, they debuted their catalog, with lamps from Carlo Urbinati and Allesandro Vecchiato, who would become the company’s managers by 1988. Eventually these new owners would move the company off the island and into Venice, as well as transition Foscarini from a glassworks shop to a major design competitor. They had already begun working with external designers in 1985, but their first success came in 1990 with Rodolfo Dordoni’s “Lumiere.” Most all lighting projects were made of glass until 1993, at which point the Havana lamp primarily used polyethylene, making it lighter, more cost-effective, and able to be used indoors and outdoors. It now resides in the MoMA in New York. Other successful lamps would come to define the company, such as the “Mite & Tite” series by Marc Sadler in 2000 (which earned a Compasso d’oro), Patricia Urquiola’s 2005 “Caboche,” and Marc Sadler’s signature lamp "Twiggy."
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