Eero Saarinen
Finnish-American Eero Saarinen (1910 –1961) was famous for varying his style according to the demands of the project. His father taught at the Cranbrook Academy of Art, where Eero took classes and formed relationships with fellow students Charles and Ray Eames, and Florence Knoll. Saarinen studied sculpture at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière in Paris, France, and later at the Yale School of Architecture, completing his studies in 1934. He joined the US Military, where he was assigned to draw illustrations for bomb disassembly manuals and to provide designs for the Situation Room in the White House. He founded his own office in 1950, after his father’s death. His first success, the “Tulip Chair” was produced by the Knoll company, beginning a long relationship between Knoll and Saarinen. While still working for his father, he won the design competition for the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, in St. Louis, aka the Gateway Arch.